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A former Google executive has raised concerns about the tech giant’s human rights policies as it eyes expansion in China and elsewhere.

Ross LaJeunesse, the firm’s former head of global international relations, said he was “sidelined” after he pushed the company to take a stronger stance.

Google defended its record in a statement, saying it has an “unwavering commitment” to human rights.

Mr LaJeunesse is now campaigning for a seat in the US senate.

He said his experience at Google convinced him of the need for tougher tech regulations.

“No longer can massive tech companies like Google be permitted to operate relatively free from government oversight,” he wrote in a post on Medium.

Tech entrepreneurs call for more government regulation
Google’s Project Dragonfly ‘terminated’ in China
Google’s main search business quit China in 2010 in protest of the country’s censorship laws and alleged government hacks.

But it has since explored ways to return to the country, a major market, stirring controversy.

In July, the company said it had cancelled its efforts to develop a censored search engine in China. The “Dragonfly” programme had generated concerns about enabling state control among US politicians and some employees, including Mr LaJeunesse. Read more

Read also: Trump Bet He Could Isolate Iran and Charm North Korea. It’s Not That Easy.

A former Google executive has raised concerns about the tech giant’s human rights policies as it eyes expansion in China and elsewhere.

A former Google executive has raised concerns about the tech giant’s human rights policies as it eyes expansion in China and elsewhere.

A former Google executive has raised concerns about the tech giant’s human rights policies as it eyes expansion in China and elsewhere.

A former Google executive has raised concerns about the tech giant’s human rights policies as it eyes expansion in China and elsewhere.