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FISA  : The White House issued a stern statement late Wednesday pleading with Congress not to approve strict limits to the government’s foreign spy powers, suggesting that adding civil rights checks could lead to another Sept. 11-style attack.

The warning came a day before the House is slated to vote on whether to renew Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which governs the collection of communications from foreign targets.

A coalition of conservatives and liberals will try to add new protections into the law for Americans whose data is scooped up in the collections, requiring the government to get a warrant before it can dig through the Americans’ information for domestic criminal cases.

 But the White House said that would risk returning to the days before 2001, when civil liberties rules walled off criminal investigators and foreign spies, keeping them from sharing information. Read more

The warning came a day before the House is slated to vote on whether to renew Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which governs the collection of communications from foreign targets.

A coalition of conservatives and liberals will try to add new protections into the law for Americans whose data is scooped up in the collections, requiring the government to get a warrant before it can dig through the Americans’ information for domestic criminal cases.

 But the White House said that would risk returning to the days before 2001, when civil liberties rules walled off criminal investigators and foreign spies, keeping them from sharing information.

The warning came a day before the House is slated to vote on whether to renew Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which governs the collection of communications from foreign targets.

A coalition of conservatives and liberals will try to add new protections into the law for Americans whose data is scooped up in the collections, requiring the government to get a warrant before it can dig through the Americans’ information for domestic criminal cases.

 But the White House said that would risk returning to the days before 2001, when civil liberties rules walled off criminal investigators and foreign spies, keeping them from sharing information.