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Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

There are no stadiums full of placard-waving supporters, no giant street rallies for British Prime Minister Theresa May these days as she makes a last-ditch effort to sell her Brexit deal to guide her country’s departure from the European Union.

Instead, the beleaguered leader has to make do with a lackluster welcome and the prospect that her country will crash out of the EU without a map for the way forward.

Case in point: a leather factory near Glasgow last week, where workers largely carried on with their duties in the background as Mrs. May conducted interviews on camera. The workers were more interested in finishing their shifts than listening to the prime minister sell her vision of how the country will navigate its momentous divorce from the EU in a little more than three months.

Facing daunting odds in Parliament, the Conservative prime minister hit the road last week on a two-day trip through the Celtic countries of the United Kingdom, starting at a winter fair in Wales, followed by a university in Northern Ireland and finishing at a factory in Scotland. But analysts say the tour only underscored the political problem of her compromise deal: The many warring sides of the Brexit battle finally found common ground in their dislike for her handiwork. Read more

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Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception

Theresa May last-ditch Brexit plan pitch meets cold reception