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At a private luncheon in New York on Sept. 26, President Trump labeled a CIA employee turned whistleblower “almost a spy,” doubling down on assaults he’s launched against the nation’s intelligence employees since before he was inaugurated in 2017.

The whistleblower’s chief concern, now backed up by at least one other colleague with direct knowledge, is that Trump implied to Ukraine’s freshly elected leader, Volodymyr Zelensky, that he would withhold U.S. military aid in exchange for the government in Kiev reigniting an investigation into the family of Joe Biden, a leading contender for the Democratic presidential nomination.

While those two intelligence officers have taken the rare step of formally reporting concerns about Trump’s activities, others employed throughout the government’s intelligence community are putting their heads down and hope to stay out of the political fray, according to over a dozen current and former intelligence and national security officials who spoke to Yahoo News. Those officials requested anonymity to discuss private conversations about the internal atmosphere at the agencies, and to avoid retaliation.

It is possible that additional whistleblowers will come forward to pile on evidence that Trump is committing crimes, making the original Ukraine whistleblower the impetus for a watershed moment that will topple Trump’s presidency. Read more

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At a private luncheon in New York on Sept. 26, President Trump labeled a CIA employee turned whistleblower “almost a spy,” doubling down on assaults he’s launched against the nation’s intelligence employees since before he was inaugurated in 2017.

At a private luncheon in New York on Sept. 26, President Trump labeled a CIA employee turned whistleblower “almost a spy,” doubling down on assaults he’s launched against the nation’s intelligence employees since before he was inaugurated in 2017.

At a private luncheon in New York on Sept. 26, President Trump labeled a CIA employee turned whistleblower “almost a spy,” doubling down on assaults he’s launched against the nation’s intelligence employees since before he was inaugurated in 2017.