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Skepticism abounds that any measure significantly changing the nation’s laws related to gun control will gain enough Republican support in the Senate to pass, coming a week after President Donald Trump’s tours of Dayton and El Paso. But Trump’s aides and congressional officials have begun early stage talks on some possible responses.

One such idea would expand background checks on gun sales, according to officials from both the White House and Congress, but GOP senators continue to signal to Trump that a major push for new gun laws could alienate the voters he’ll need to win reelection.

According to those officials in the discussions between White House officials and staffs for Sens. Joe Manchin, Pat Toomey and Chris Murphy, the aides have ticked through the various past iterations of the background check bill sponsored by Toomey, a Republican, and Manchin, a moderate Democrat. That measure failed to gain approval in 2013, following the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, which took place in Murphy’s home state of Connecticut.

The sessions have been “informational, not substantive,” one official said. Trump’s aides hope to present him a slate of options during a briefing scheduled for later this week at his Bedminster, New Jersey, golf club, where he is currently on a summer vacation. They hope to give him a realistic picture of what measures could pass in Congress, according to White House officials. Read more

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Skepticism abounds that any measure significantly changing the nation’s laws related to gun control will gain enough Republican support in the Senate to pass, coming a week after President Donald Trump’s tours of Dayton and El Paso. But Trump’s aides and congressional officials have begun early stage talks on some possible responses.

Skepticism abounds that any measure significantly changing the nation’s laws related to gun control will gain enough Republican support in the Senate to pass, coming a week after President Donald Trump’s tours of Dayton and El Paso. But Trump’s aides and congressional officials have begun early stage talks on some possible responses.