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Khashoggi and fellow Saudi dissidents share a similar fate

 

Prominent critic of Saudi Arabia and its leadership, Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi disappeared at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last Tuesday and is now presumed dead by several Turkish officials who are rigorously investigating the matter.

An advocate for free speech in the kingdom, the 58-year-old journalist had been living in a self-exile to avoid a possible arrest in light of the slew of imprisonments among his compatriots.

He has been missing since the afternoon of Oct. 2, after he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to get several documents for marriage procedures. An investigation by Turkish prosecutors is ongoing and Turkish authorities including President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan are closely investigating the matter.

Since becoming the new power behind the throne in 2017, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is set on modernizing the kingdom, leaving little room for criticism. Over the years, he has given women the right to drive but jailed the women activists whom called for the reform. He has also imprisoned intellectuals and businessmen as a warning to those who attempt to oppose the kingdom.

Under Saudi Arabian law, detaining individuals for a wide array of “crimes” is made easy with regulations that provide ample room for prosecution, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), an NGO working in digital privacy, free speech, and innovation issues. Read more

 

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Khashoggi and fellow Saudi dissidents share a similar fate

Khashoggi and fellow Saudi dissidents share a similar fate

Khashoggi and fellow Saudi dissidents share a similar fate

rominent critic of Saudi Arabia and its leadership, Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi disappeared at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last Tuesday and is now presumed dead by several Turkish officials who are rigorously investigating the matter.