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Hurricane Irma: Where it is now and what we know: Hurricane Irma was downgraded to a tropical storm early Monday after it barreled into Florida on Sunday, crashing through the Florida Keys before making a second landfall near Naples on the Gulf Coast and setting a course for Georgia.

It flooded streets, snapped construction cranes and left 58% of Florida electricity customers without power — about 5.8 million accounts — according to Florida’s State Emergency Response Team. Meanwhile, more than 100,000 customers in Georgia also were without power Monday.

At least 5 deaths in Florida were attributed to Irma, according to ABC News. The storm also killed at least 20 people in the Caribbean since roaring out of the Atlantic Ocean and chewing through a string of islands.

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Related News: Hurricane Irma’s track through center of Florida is unusual. Read More…

Hurricane Irma: Where it is now and what we know: Hurricane Irma was downgraded to a tropical storm early Monday after it barreled into Florida on Sunday, crashing through the Florida Keys before making a second landfall near Naples on the Gulf Coast and setting a course for Georgia. It flooded streets, snapped construction cranes and left 58% of Florida electricity customers without power — about 5.8 million accounts — according to Florida’s StateEmergencyResponse Team. Meanwhile, more than 100,000 customers in Georgia also were without power MondaAt least 5 deaths in Florida were attributed to Irma, according to ABC News. The storm also killed at least 20 people in the Caribbean since roaring out of the Atlantic Ocean and chewing through a string of islands.Hurricane Irma: Where it is now and what we know: Hurricane Irma was downgraded to a tropical storm early Monday after it barreled into Florida on Sunday, crashing through the Florida Keys before making a second landfall near Naples on the Gulf Coast and setting a course forGeorgia. It flooded streets, snapped construction cranes and left 58% of Florida electricity customers without power — about 5.8 million accounts — according to Florida’s State EmergencyResponse Team. Meanwhile, more than 100,000 customers in Georgia also were without power Monday.