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China vows retaliation as U.S. ups trade war ante, threatens tariffs on $200 billion of goods

China slammed the U.S. threat to expand tariff hikes to imports including apples, fish sticks and French doors as a “totally unacceptable” escalation of their trade battle on Wednesday and vowed to protect its “core interests.”

The Trump administration raised the stakes in the growing trade dispute, threatening 10 percent tariffs on a list of $200 billion worth of Chinese imports, sending stocks lower and prompting Beijing to warn it would be forced to respond.

 China’s commerce ministry said it was “shocked” and would complain to the World Trade Organisation, but did not immediately say how it would retaliate.

Beijing has said it would hit back against Washington’s escalating tariff measures, including through “qualitative measures,” a threat that U.S. businesses in China fear could mean anything from stepped-up inspections to delays in investment approvals and even consumer boycotts.

The spiraling conflict over Chinese technology policy threatens to chill global economic growth. It stems from Washington’s belief that Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology and worries that plans for state-led development of Chinese champions in robots and other fields might erode American industrial leadership.

The U.S. Trade Representative announced the possible second round of tariff hikes on Tuesday targeting a $200 billion list of Chinese goods ranging from burglar alarms to mackerel. That came four days after Washington added 25 percent duties on $34 billion of Chinese goods and Beijing responded by increasing its own taxes on the same amount of American imports. Read more

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China vows retaliation as U.S. ups trade war ante, threatens tariffs on $200 billion of goods

China vows retaliation as U.S. ups trade war ante, threatens tariffs on $200 billion of goods

China vows retaliation as U.S. ups trade war ante, threatens tariffs on $200 billion of goods