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California legislation that would require presidential and state gubernatorial candidates to release their tax returns in order to appear on the state’s ballot cleared a significant hurdle, passing the State Assembly with an overwhelming majority vote.

SB 27, co-authored by Senators Mike McGuire and Scott Wiener, was approved by the State Assembly Monday with a 57-17 vote, according to McGuire’s office. It will be heard again in the State Senate this week, and if approved, will head to Gov. Gavin Newsom for his signature.

“Presidential candidates need to put their own interests aside in the name of transparency,” McGuire’s office said in a written statement. “So far, our current President has done the opposite and it’s time that President Trump steps up, stops with the obstruction, and follows through with 40 years of time-honored tradition that has made this nation’s democracy stronger. This commonsense legislation applies equally to all candidates, from all political parties, including the Governor of California.”

In May, McGuire and Wiener amended the legislation to extend the transparency rules to the office of the Governor of California, as well as presidential candidates.

The Presidential Tax Transparency & Accountability Act will require basic tax information to be shared with California residents, and require that all presidential and gubernatorial candidates release the last five years of their tax returns in order to appear on the state ballot. The returns will be made available to the public on the Secretary of State’s website, according to McGuire’s office. Read more

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California legislation that would require presidential and state gubernatorial candidates to release their tax returns in order to appear on the state’s ballot cleared a significant hurdle, passing the State Assembly with an overwhelming majority vote.

California legislation that would require presidential and state gubernatorial candidates to release their tax returns in order to appear on the state’s ballot cleared a significant hurdle, passing the State Assembly with an overwhelming majority vote.