Select Page

Anti-Trump governors : Hector Barajas was convicted of shooting at a vehicle in 2002, was deported back to Mexico, quickly snuck back into the U.S. was caught and deported again. He then started a support group for fellow veterans deported to Mexico, worked to get them health care — and, last year, earned a pardon from California Gov. Jerry Brown for his crime.

On Friday he’ll cross the border once again, arriving in San Diego, where he’ll be sworn in as a U.S. citizen.

To his backers, it’s a long-overdue recognition for a man who devoted years of his life to his adopted country, made bad decisions but has has since gotten his life together and deserves the right to join American society.

They are hoping he’s blazed a path other people — and particularly veterans — might be able to follow, winning pardons to halt their deportations or even earn the right to come back.

Hector’s case is in many ways a classic example how draconian our immigration laws have become,” said Bardis Vakili, a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union in San Diego, which went to court to force the citizenship issue earlier this year. “The same unforgiving deportation machine that routinely sweeps up hard-working immigrants. Read more

Read also: White House No final decision on Syria action

Anti-Trump governors : Hector Barajas was convicted of shooting at a vehicle in 2002, was deported back to Mexico, quickly snuck back into the U.S. was caught and deported again. He then started a support group for fellow veterans deported to Mexico, worked to get them health care — and, last year, earned a pardon from California Gov. Jerry Brown for his crime.

On Friday he’ll cross the border once again, arriving in San Diego, where he’ll be sworn in as a U.S. citizen.

To his backers, it’s a long-overdue recognition for a man who devoted years of his life to his adopted country, made bad decisions but has has since gotten his life together and deserves the right to join American society.